Stephen Rogerson

Stephen Rogerson MBBS DTM&H FRACP PhD

Role within the MiP Consortium: Principal Investigator MA7 & MA13

Current Appointment: Professor of Medicine, University of Melbourne

Areas of interest: Malaria

Background:

Prof Rogerson is an infectious diseases physician by training, and graduated in medicine in 1982. His postgraduate clinical training was in Adelaide, Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Liverpool, UK, where he also took the Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and worked for a period before returning to Australia to undertake a PhD at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research on malaria pathogenesis.

Following his PhD he was awarded a welcome Trust Career Development Fellowship based in Blantyre, Malawi, where he began work on malaria in pregnancy, which he has continued for over 15 years. He returned to Australia on a Wellcome Trust Senior Overseas Fellowship, joining the University of Melbourne’s Department of Medicine.

Apart from the Wellcome Trust his work has been supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the National Institutes of Health, USAID, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, among others.

He is presently a member of the Wellcome Trust Public Health and Tropical Medicine Interview Committee.

Research:

His main research interests include the pathogenesis of malaria in pregnancy and childhood, and understanding how malaria causes low birth weight and its effects on placental function. He is the principal investigator for 2 activities within the MiP Consortium.

Prevention in Papua New Guinea.

He is coordinating a study of the effect of azithromycin plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine on low birth weight in Papua New Guinean women.

Pathogenesis and immunity.
Dr rogerson coordinates a number of cross-cutting activities within the consortium focussed around drug resistance, molecular diagnosis of malaria, histopathology of placental malaria, and studies to support graduate scientists investigating malaria in pregnancy pathogenesis.